What Should I Do If My Car Overheats?

The cooling system for your engine is what’s known as a vital system. Simply put, you can’t go anywhere when it’s not functioning properly. As Popular Mechanics explains, your gasoline engine goes because of controlled explosions. Imagine the heat that that process can generate! So, in turn, your cooling system does just that: it helps cool the engine so that the temperature of your engine can be controlled.

When your cooling system fails for any reason, that heat will build up to dangerous levels. Other than more dramatic ways like steam issuing from under your hood, this is indicated by the temperature gauge on your dash going up.

You might be asking, “What should I do if my car overheats?” If this happens when you are in transit, immediately turn off your air-conditioner. If you are stopped in traffic, consider shifting to neutral or even turning your car off until the light turns green. In either case, you need to pull over as soon as it’s safe and turn the engine off.

The cooling system is composed of the radiator, hoses, temperature gauge, and other component parts. Assuming your vehicle isn’t too old, it’s unlikely that your radiator is the issue. What is likely is that your temperature gauge has gone bad or a hose has ruptured. Luckily, both are relatively inexpensive fixes.

source: http://usedcarswilmingtonnc.rippyautoworld.com/147/what-should-i-do-if-my-car-overheats/

5 Must-Know Steps If Your Car Overheats

When the mercury begins to rise outside, it’s common for car engines to get overly toasty too. Thankfully, there are plenty of things you can do to make sure a temporary jump in temperature doesn’t lead to long-lasting trouble. To help you know what to do if your car overheats, here are 5 easy steps.

  1. First, always carry an extra bottle of coolant (also called antifreeze) in your car, as well as a jug of water. Engines typically overheat because the coolant’s low, so topping it off will usually solve the problem. Failing that, water will also temporarily do the trick. Plus, that water could be a lifesaver on long, sweltering summer drives. Just don’t drink it all.
  2. When you see the temperature gauge creeping into the red or a notification light glowing, immediately turn off your air conditioner (since the AC puts a lot of strain on your engine). Roll the windows down to cool off the way nature intended.
  3. If the problem persists, crank your heater up to full blast. It could make the next few miles a pretty brutal experience, but the transfer of heat away from the engine might just save its life.
  4. Should the preceding steps fail, pull over as soon as you can. Turn off the engine. If you can pop the hood from the driver’s seat, do so — but don’t risk opening it by hand until the engine has cooled, especially if you see steam wafting off the engine. It typically takes a solid 30 minutes for an engine to cool down enough for it to be safe to handle. If you’d rather let a professional handle the problem, it’s time to call for a tow truck.
  5. Once the engine has cooled, check the coolant tank. It’s usually a translucent plastic tank near the radiator. If the coolant tank is empty, you may have sprung a leak. Take a quick look under the car. If you notice a drip or puddle, chances are the coolant tank is leaking.

If you do have a leak, carefully open the radiator cap. Place a cloth over the radiator cap to protect your hand, and tilt the cap away from you as it opens. Refill the cooled radiator with your spare coolant or water.Do not pour cold water into a still-hot radiator — it could cause the engine block to crack due to the sudden change in temperature. If you absolutely have to add water while the engine is still warm, pour slowly while the engine is running in neutral or park.

Note that most cars require a 50/50 mix of coolant with water to prevent overheating, so you won’t be able to drive indefinitely with nothing but water. If you don’t have coolant on hand when your car overheats, make sure to add a comparable amount of coolant as soon as possible.

If the coolant tank is full, the problem may be electrical or mechanical in nature, in which case a tow to the nearest repair shop is definitely in order. A leaking hose, worn or broken fan belt, bad water pump, or malfunctioning thermostat may be the culprit.

What to do if you’re in traffic

Being in traffic when your car begins to overheat can make the situation that much more stressful. But it’s important that you let your cooler head prevail and follow these tips:

  • If you’re stopped in traffic, put the car in neutral or park and rev the engine a bit. This will encourage water and air flow through the radiator, helping to cool it.
  • If you’re in stop-and-go traffic, aim to creep rather than alternating between braking and accelerating. Braking generates a lot of friction, which will only turn up the heat.

If the needle’s in the red

It’s not common for contemporary cars to overheat, and it’s never a good thing, regardless of your vehicle’s age. If you find that your car often gets a little hot under the hood, it’s probably an indication of a larger problem, so consult your repair shop or trusted auto expert.

In the summertime …

Keep the livin’ easy by watching the temperature gauge, storing bottles of water and coolant in the back, and maybe even stashing this list in your glove compartment. You don’t want a volcanically hot engine ruining your summer road trip — or worse yet, your engine.

source:http://blog.esurance.com/what-to-do-if-your-car-overheats/#.VuthxuIrKUk

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